Clinical and Translational Science

Clinical and Translational Sciences

The Department of Clinical and Translational Sciences (DCTS) was created to foster collaboration and enrichment among clinicians and basic scientists. Permanent and joint-faculty work together within an integrated structure to advance research and therapy options for Central Appalachia.

DCTS is the academic home for the Appalachian Clinical Translational Science Institute (ACTSI) at Marshall University, the Marshall Clinical Research Center and Marshall Informatics that provides support and resources to researchers, clinicians and patient advocates working to improve the health of the people of Appalachia. This multidisciplinary department leverages a variety of expertise to address issues through the full spectrum of translational science.


Sundaram

Uma Sundaram, MD
Chairman

Phone: (304) 691-1841
sundaramu@marshall.edu
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Uma Sundaram, MD, is the Director of the Appalachian Clinical and Translational Science Institute. Dr. Sundaram is a gastroenterologist specializing in the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and hepatobiliary diseases and in therapeutic biliary endoscopy. Dr. Sundaram has demonstrated a commitment to basic, clinical and translational research dating back to his undergraduate training in Bioengineering at Johns Hopkins University. During this time his research in the National Institutes on Aging led to multiple co-authored publications in blood brain barrier drug entry and distribution modeling. Upon obtaining his MD at the Medical College of Ohio, residency training at the University of Michigan and subspecialty training at Yale University, he has been a clinician scientist with funding for both basic and clinical research. In 2006, Dr. Sundaram established the Digestive Disease Fellowship Training Program at WVU HSC, the only GI fellowship training program in the State. Dr. Sundaram is currently funded by two NIH R01s to study regulation of nutrient and electrolyte malabsorption in inflammatory bowel disease. He has and continues to serve on numerous study sections both in NIDDK and at the Veterans Affairs Merit Review.


Arthur

Subha Arthur, PhD
Assistant Professor

arthursu@marshall.edu
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Obesity is increasingly being recognized as a growing epidemic around the world and has become one of the prime concerns of United States health care. More significantly, obesity is the prime reason for health disparity in the state of West Virginia. Obesity is characterized by accumulation of excess fat in the body, resulting in its related complications such as heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, hypertension etc.

The primary source of fats is dietary. Absorption of dietary fats is in turn facilitated by intestinal bile acids. Bile acids are amphipathic molecules that are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and secreted in bile into the small intestine where they facilitate solubilization and digestion of lipids. After aiding in lipid absorption, bile acids are reabsorbed in the distal intestine to be taken back into the enterohepatic circulation. Defective bile acid reabsorption at the distal intestine has been shown to reduce lipid and lipid soluble vitamin absorption resulting in malnutrition and related complications.


Larre

Shelvy L. Campbell, PhD
Assistant Dean of Diversity

campbels@marshall.edu

The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University holds diversity as a core value of its educational, research, service and health care missions. We promote an inclusive academic health care community because we believe that a diverse population offers a rich environment that leads to greater knowledge, understanding, acceptance and mutual respect.


Cecchetti

Alfred Cecchetti, PhD, MSc, MSc IS
Assistant Professor

Phone: (304) 691-1834
cecchetti@marshall.edu
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Alfred Cecchetti, PhD, MSc, MSc IS, is currently a Research Assistant Professor and Clinical Informatics Data Architect for the Department of Clinical and Translational Sciences at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. He has a Ph. D in Information Management, Master of Science in Information Science, a Master of Science in Biostatistics, all from the University of Pittsburgh, and an undergraduate Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Previously, Dr. Cecchetti was a Research Associate as well as Co-Director of the Clinical Pharmacology Data & Analysis center and Co-Director of the General Clinical Research IT Core in the Center for Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, in the School of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. In these positions, he provided advanced database management, analytics, statistical, academic, and administrative as well as research support for a number of multi-center projects and grants. Dr. Cecchetti was also the director of research management for the Department of Cardiology at the University of Pittsburgh as well as a database and analytics consultant for a number of commercial and pharmaceutical companies.


Davies

Todd Davies, PhD
Assistant Professor
daviest@marshall.edu
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Todd Davies, PhD, is currently the Director of Research Development and Translation and Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at Marshall University’s Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine where he manages the Marshall Clinical Research Center, a newly developed hub for clinical trial activity at Marshall. The Marshall Clinical Research Center is dedicated to bringing cutting edge clinical research and advanced care to Marshall and throughout rural West Virginia.

Dr. Davies has a diverse background. He received his Ph.D. in Medical Science from the University of Toledo Medical Center, his B.S. in Biology from Wesley College and his A.A.S. in Aerospace Ground Equipment from the Community College of the Air Force.


Larre

Isabel Larre', PhD
Assistant Professor

perezm@marshall.edu
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M. Isabel Larre, PhD, was named Assistant Investigator in Residence in November 2014. Larre most recently was on the faculty of CINVESTAV where she served as a visiting professor.

She has a bachelor´s degree in Experimental Biology at The Metropolitan Autonomous University in Mexico. She continued her Master and Doctoral degree in Cellular and Molecular Physiology at Department of Physiology, Biophysics & Neuroscience of Center for Research and Advanced Studies of National Polytechnic Institute (CINVESTAV) in Mexico. In 2012 she got a postdoctoral Fellowship from Institute of Science and Technology of D.F. (ICyTDF) for women, Rosalind Franklin at CINVESTAV.


Yanling

Yanling Yan, PhD
Assistant Professor

yan@marshall.edu
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My major research interest is the role of reactive oxygen species in cardiotonic steroids-mediated Na/K-ATPase signaling and renal sodium handling. Our long-term goal is to open up the possibility of a translational clinical research and improve the prognosis of hypertension and develop personalized patient management.

Sutoidem M. Akpanudo, MD
Associate Professor
akpanudo@marshall.edu
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I am a general internist with a doctorate in health statistics and study design, and prior experience in supporting faculty and trainees with research and training in biostatistics and study design. While I am an internist by training, I have also completed post graduate training in public health, with specific focus on health promotion and education. I have also completed post graduate training in statistics and research design with specific interest in survey instrument development and program evaluation. As a doctoral fellow at the University of Toledo, I was involved in minority health and smoking cessation research. I gained valuable training and experience in designing, evaluating and implementing grant funded projects. Since completion of my graduate education and Internal Medicine residency program, I have worked on several research projects.


Throughout my scientific career, I have focused on studying diabetes mellitus and obesity. During my undergraduate work, I participated in multiple research internships that involved studying the translocation of stress proteins in diabetic and aged rodent models. These experiences paved my way to graduate school where I trained under Dr. Brad Hillgartner and studied the anti-diabetic hormone, FGF21. During my tenure, I received an American Heart Pre-doctoral fellowship and authored/co-authored several papers. Following graduate school, I pursued further training as a postdoctoral fellow at Vanderbilt in the lab of Dr. Roland Stein where I studied transcription factors involved in pancreas development/function and pregnancy. Together, these opportunities have given me a skill set to look at diabetes at a multi-organ level. Therefore, I aim to further delineate the interaction between tissues affected during diabetes/GDM (pancreas, liver), further elaborate on the role of bile acids, and translate my work to human therapeutics. In addition, I hope to continue my studies on FGF21 and discern its role in the pancreas. Being from West Virginia and seeing firsthand the devastation of this disease, my goal was always to come back to the state and mentor future researchers to help with the ongoing epidemic. Here at Marshall, I have the ability to do cutting-edge research with the help of core facilities and mentors that are involved in the field.


Piyali Dasgupta, PhD
dasgupta@marshall.edu

Studies in my laboratory examine how components of tobacco can promote the progression of lung cancer. Nicotine is the major active and addictive component of cigarette smoke. Our research focuses on how nicotine can facilitate the growth and progression of lung cancers. Although nicotine is not a carcinogen, my studies indicate that it can induce proliferation, angiogenesis and metastasis of lung cancers.


Sundaram

Richard Egleton, PhD
Associate Professor, Research Cluster Coordinator, & Co-Director of Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program

Phone: (304) 696-3523
egleton@marshall.edu
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I have a varied interest in research with four major research areas. These areas all focus on endothelial cell function and tissue barriers. Though my initial studies focused on transport, my current interest is how health care issues common in Appalachia (Diabetes, hypertension substance abuse) regulate brain endothelial function and what role this plays in psychiatric disorders. My studies have been funded via federal grants at both the PPG and RO1 level. This research has resulted in 43 publications with Pubmed IDs, three other research publications, four book chapters, and one book as an editor, as well as numerous abstracts to scientific conferences


Sundaram

Todd L. Green, PhD
Associate Professor & Co-Director of Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program

Phone: (304) 696-3531
green@marshall.edu
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I have carried out research in a number of areas. However my primary interests have been in extracellular matrix formation and the role of enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis in cardiovascular function, which has resulted in a total of 11 publications. Over the last decade I have concentrated on graduate education, and thus feel that my contribution goes far beyond that of my publication record.


Dioxins are a family of fat soluble pollutants found in the environment due to their stability, municipal waste incineration, and the manufacture of herbicides and pesticides – resulting in levels of this chemical that range from parts per trillion to parts per billion in humans. While it is clear that this family of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have a potent deleterious effect on wildlife species, their impact on human health is still a controversial subject. This lack of clarity is due, at least in part, to too few human studies, and a need for a deeper mechanistic understanding of how exposure to pollutants – like dioxins – may impact human health. As detailed below, I am interested in understanding the mechanism of endocrine disruptor action in the ovary and breast.


Ambient temperature and physical activity have a surprising impact on bone length, but it is unclear how such common variables regulate growth of the postnatal skeleton. We study environmental inputs on bone elongation in growth plates, the regions of cartilage where bone lengthening occurs. Our long-term goal is to identify the physiological mechanisms underlying temperature- and exercise- enhanced bone elongation in the growth plate, with the intent of finding new ways to potentially treat growth impediments in children. We employ whole animal and bone culture models to test specific hypotheses about environmental effects on the growth plate matrix, its vasculature, and nutrient supply.


My principle research focus is to investigate contributions of chronic oxidative stress and metabolic imbalance as it pertains to development of obesity and diabetes with associated long-term complications. In this regard, during the last five years my research with Dr. Abraham focused on physiological and molecular aspects at (dys) regulation of the cellular antioxidant defense system i.e. the heme-heme oxygenase system in association with chronic redox imbalance. Heme oxygenase also serves as the mediator of cross talk between adipose tissue and the vasculature. In this regard, I have studied the impact of adipocyte dysfunction on vascular endothelial integrity through the prism of heme oxygenase.

Sacconi

Kelly Gelbman
Administrative Assistant to Vice Dean, Research & Graduate Education
gelbman@marshall.edu


Sacconi

Trish Sacconi, CMOM
Administrator
sacconi@marshall.edu

As a member of the Marshall Clinical Research Center team, I am privileged to be working in an atmosphere of acceleration and development of clinical and translational research that potentially holds future cures and enhanced treatment options for many facing difficult diseases and diagnoses. Our commitment today is to use our collaborations, expertise and partnerships to assist our investigators and students to conduct quality research to transform lives in the future.


Anita "Gigi" Mathis
Administrative Assistant
mathis@marshall.edu
Phone: (304) 696-7322


Marie Murphy
Administrative Assistant
murphyma@marshall.edu
Phone: (304) 696-7278


Sacconi

Diana R. Maue
Graduate Recruitment and Communication Coordinator
maue1@marshall.edu
Phone: (304) 696-3365


Sacconi

Kelly Carothers
Assistant Graduate Recruiter
carothers@marshall.edu
Phone: (304) 696-7279

Ashford

Amber Deller, RN, Lead Coordinator
dellera@marshall.edu

Clinical research is critical in terms of developing new therapies as well as enhancing existing ones in health care. We offer trials in several specialties of medicine and are able to work with sponsor related trials as well as investigator initiated studies with physicians here at Marshall Health, Marshall University Physicians and Surgeons and Cabell Huntington Hospital. I am proud to work with this dedicated group of professionals who strive for the best in patient care. I am proud to work with and serve our patients and our community through clinical research that is vital to improving our standards of care.


Ashford

Robin Ashford, Pharm D, Coordinator
ashford@marshall.edu

Conducting research and pharmaceutical clinical trials allow me to assist all specialties at Marshall University in bringing novel medications and therapy to market. While not every trial is successful, the knowledge gained is valuable and expedites the entire process.


Ashford

MaryBeth Cordle, MS, Quality Officer
cordlem@marshall.edu

The future of battling diseases and illnesses, and discovering new ways of preventing people from becoming ill, are only possible because people of all ages are willing to participate in the clinical trials that shape medicine’s next steps. Clinical research trials help develop new ways to diagnose illnesses or diseases, and create effective treatments and vaccines. People choose to participate in a clinical trial for various reasons: it gives them a sense that they have helped develop a treatment or a cure that has had an impact on them or someone they love; they obtain access to a new medication or therapy that they might not have access to; others like the benefit of attention and close observation involved with a clinical trial that results from study-related appointments or scheduling that might be required for gathering additional information and data. Many patients simply participate because they feel that they can have an impact on providing better care to everyone.


Marcum

Melissa Marcum, RN
Coordinator

mmarcum@marshall.edu

Our region of Appalachia has statistically higher rates of mortality and comorbid diseases than surrounding areas. The need for newer techniques, devices and medications is of utmost importance. Our role, with Marshall University School of Medicine, elevates the Marshall Clinical Research Center to the forefront of cutting edge technology. We are proud to be able to deliver this advanced health care to our community.


Marcum

Douglas Melton, LPN, FACHE
Coordinator

meltond@marshall.edu

I work with a diverse group of researchers and clinicians who have given me great insight into academic research in the advancement of population health, and public health. Through Marshall University School of Medicine and Marshall Health we gain great insight in how we can improve our communities’ quality of health which could not be done without the communities’ involvement to help advance medications and technology. I am honored to be allowed to contribute to our community in such a dynamic way.


Ashford

Dawn Molina, RN
molina@marshall.edu


Morgan

Linda Morgan, RN
Coordinator

lsmorgan@marshall.edu

Being a part of the MCRC team is such a privilege. It is very exciting as well as rewarding to be involved with projects that can potentially shape the future of medicine. I am currently working on studies in the orthopedic department that covers many topics related to bone healthcare and treatment of injuries. I also have studies in the Neurology Department related to Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and the disease modifying therapy agents used to treat that disease.


Smith

Rebecca Smith, APRN FNP-C
Coordinator

smith2048@marshall.edu

Rebecca Smith, APRN FNP-C is the Lead Clinical Coordinator of all Investigator-Initiated Trials. The Principal Investigators include Dr. Uma Sundaram, Dr. Todd Gress, Dr. Lynn Goebel, and Dr. Prasanna Santhanam.

Cecchetti

Alfred Cecchetti, PhD, MSc, MSc IS
Clinical Informatics Data Architect
DCTS

Phone: (304) 691-1834
cecchetti@marshall.edu

Dr. Cecchetti is currently a Research Assistant Professor and Clinical Informatics Data Architect for the Department of Clinical and Translational Sciences at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. He has a Ph. D in Information Management, Master of Science in Information Science, a Master of Science in Biostatistics, all from the University of Pittsburgh, and an undergraduate Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Previously, Dr. Cecchetti was a Research Associate as well as Co-Director of the Clinical Pharmacology Data & Analysis center and Co-Director of the General Clinical Research IT Core in the Center for Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, in the School of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. In these positions, he provided advanced database management, analytics, statistical, academic, and administrative as well as research support for a number of multi-center projects and grants. Dr. Cecchetti was also the director of research management for the Department of Cardiology at the University of Pittsburgh as well as a database and analytics consultant for a number of commercial and pharmaceutical companies.


Schafer

Christopher Schafer, CHTS-PW
Data Integrity Analyst
DCTS

Phone: (304) 691-1842
schafer4@marshall.edu

Chris Schafer joined the Health Informatics team in June 2014 as a Data Integrity Analyst. Chris works closely with the Clinical Informatics Data Architect to assure continuous quality management of data standards and content is key to ensuring that information is useable and actionable.

Prior to joining the Health Informatics team, Chris assisted Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) across West Virginia on using their data to drive health improvement, specifically with preventative care services and chronic disease management.

Singh

M. Kathiresh Kumar, PhD
Coordinator


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I have been in training as a postdoctoral researcher for the past year under the eminent supervision of Dr. Uma Sundaram. I have been trained to work with transporters such as Na-Glutamine, SGLT-1 and NEH3 in the brush border membrane and IEC-18 cells.


palianappan

Balasubramanian Palaniappan, PhD
Coordinator

palianappan@marshall.edu
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My research interest is functional physiology of electrolyte and Na-nutrient transporters in the in vivo and in vitro models of chronic enteritis. My current research focus is to decipher the intracellular mechanism involved in Ca++ and nitric oxide mediated regulation of SGLT1 (Sodium dependent glucose co-transport) and NHE3 (Sodium proton exchanger) transcription in stably transfected intestinal epithelial cells by either induce or inhibit the specific signaling pathway intermediates and their effect on SGLT1 and NHE3 activity.


Singh

Soudamani Singh, PhD
Coordinator

singhs@marshall.edu
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I am Soudamani Singh working as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Clinical and Translational Sciences This postdoctoral fellowship program allowed me to do research in Dr. Sundaram’s lab at Marshall University. I completed my PhD from Department of Endocrinology, University of Madras, in Chennai, India.

Currently I am involved in a research project studying the regulation of intestinal sodium (Na) absorption and the regulation of Na-nutrient co-transporters. It is important, since, in the normal mammalian small intestine a variety of nutrients and solutes are absorbed through the active transport process. For example glucose, which is mediated by sodium glucose co-transport 1 (SGLT1), and glutamine, which is absorbed through B0AT1 or SN2, are present in the small intestinal epithelial cells.


Singh

Justin Tomblin, PhD
Coordinator


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I have the necessary background and preparation to be considered as a future junior investigator for this COBRE, which is focused on cellular transport physiology in obesity related disorders. My postdoctoral training has given me an in depth understanding on micro-RNAs and their function, and how this relates to intestinal nutrient absorption, in the context of obesity and inflammation. My specific focus will be to decipher the network of micro- RNAs responsible for the changes in the level of nutrient transporters noted in the small intestine during the obese state. The molecular mechanisms will be elucidated via micro-RNA sequencing studies performed in two separate accepted in vivo models of obesity. Once we uncover micro-RNAs of interest, we can then target them and study whether their silencing or overexpression enhances or reduces the absorption of important transporters in the gut, such as the glutamine transporter, B0AT1. Because of my training under the supervision of the principal investigator Dr. Uma Sundaram, I can confidently say that my molecular background will play an ample part in carrying out the aims of the current research proposal being submitted.

Sundaram

Uma Sundaram, MD
Chairman

Phone: (304) 691-1841
sundaramu@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Mast cell regulation of Na-glutamine co-transporters B0AT1 in villus and SN2 in crypt cells during chronic intestinal inflammation. Singh S, Arthur S, Talukder J, Palaniappan B, Coon S, Sundaram U. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2015 April;10.1186/s12876-015-0275-5

Chronic and selective inhibition of basolateral membrane Na-K-ATPase uniquely regulates brush border membrane Na absorption in intestinal epithelial cells.Manoharan P, Gayam S, Arthur S, Palaniappan B, Singh S, Dick GM, Sundaram U. Dig Dis Sci. 2015 April;308(8):C650-6. doi: 10.1152/ajpcell.00355.2014

Molecular mechanism of regulation of villus cell Na-K-ATPase in the chronically inflamed mammalian small intestine. Saha P, Sundaram U, Manoharan P, Arthur S, Kekuda R, et al. Biochimica et biophysica acta. 2015; 1848(2):702-11.


Gress

Todd Gress, MD, MPH
Assistant Dean & Director of Clinical Research

Phone: (304) 691-8648
gress@marshall.edu
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For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy with concomitant hepatitis C virus infection, Joan C. Edwards SOM, Marshall University Belay T, Woldegiorgis H, Rayyan T, Gress T. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol.. 2015 Apr;27(4):372-4. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000000293

After-hours pediatric care compared with emergency department care: a retrospective charge analysisGoodrich S, Evans J, Werthammer J, Gress T. Clin Pediatr (Phila).. 2015 Apr;54(4):324-7. doi: 10.1177/0009922815574678

Effects of a Brief Physical Activity Program on Young Students' Physical Fitness. Hayes RM, Thompson LM, Cottrell L, Pino I, Gilkerson, CL, Flesher SL, Gress T. Clin Pediatr (Phila).. 2015 Feb 2. pii: 0009922815569204


Arthur

Subha Arthur, PhD
Assistant Professor

arthursu@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Molecular mechanism of regulation of villus cell Na-K-ATPase in the chronically inflamed mammalian small intestine. Saha P, Manoharan P, Arthur S, Sundaram S, Kekuda R, Sundaram U. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2015;1838(5):1848(2):702-11. PMID:25462166

Chronic and selective inhibition of basolateral membrane Na-K-ATPase uniquely regulates brush border membrane Na absorption in intestinal epithelial cells.Manoharan P, Gayam S, Arthur S, Palaniappan B, Singh S, Dick G, Sundaram U. American journal of physiology Cell physiology. 2015:ajpcell.00355.2014. Epub 2015/02/06. doi: 10.1152/ajpcell.00355.2014. . PMID: 25652450

Mast cell regulation of Na-glutamine co-transporters B0AT1 in villus and SN2 in crypt cells during chronic intestinal inflammation. Singh S, , Arthur S, Talukder J, Palaniappan B, Coon S, et al. BMC gastroenterology 2015; 15:47. PMID: PMC4405831


Larre
Isabel Larre', PhD
Assistant Professor

perezm@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Ouabain increases gap junctional communication in epithelial cells Ponce A, Larre I, Castillo A, García-Villegas R, Romero A, Flores Maldonado C, Martinez-Rendón J, Contreras RG, Cereijido MCell Physiol Biochem. 2014, ;34:2081-90. PMID:25562156

The emergence of the concept of tight junctions and physiological regulation by ouabain.Larre I, Ponce A, Franco M, Cereijido M. Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2014;36C:149-156. PMID: 25242280

Ouabain induces endocytosis and degradation of tight junction proteins through ERK1/2-dependent pathways. Rincon-Heredia R, Flores-Benitez D, Flores-Maldonado C, Bonilla-Delgado J, García-Hernández V, Verdejo-Torres O, Castillo AM, Larré I, Poot-Hernández AC, Franco M, Gariglio P, Reyes JL, Contreras RG Exp Cell Res. 2013.. PMID: 24140471


Dasgupta
Piyali Dasgupta, PhD

dasgupta@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Capsaicin induces apoptosis in human small cell lung cancer via the TRPV6 receptor and the calpain pathway Lau, J.K., Brown, K.C., Dom, A.M., Witte, T.R., Thornhill, B.A., Crabtree, C.M., Perry, H.E., Brown, J.M., Ball, J.G., Creel, R.G., Damron, C.L., Rollyson, W.D., Stevenson, C.D., Hardman, W.E., Valentovic, M.A., Carpenter, A.B. and Dasgupta, P.Apoptosis. 19, 1190-201. PMID:24878626

Nicotine induces the upregulation of the alpha7-nicotinic receptor (α7-nAChR) in human squamous cell lung cancer cells via the Sp1/GATA pathway.Brown, K.C., Perry, H. E., Lau, J.K., Jones, D.V., Pulliam, J.F., Thornhill, B.A., Crabtree, C.M., Luo, H., Chen, Y.C. and Dasgupta, P. J. Biol. Chem. 2013;288, 33049-59. PMID: 24089524

Inhibition of cholinergic signaling causes apoptosis in human bronchioalveolar carcinoma. Lau, J.K., Brown, K.C., Thornhill, B.A., Crabtree, C.M., Dom, A.M., Witte, T.R., Hardman, W.E., McNees, C.A., Stover, C.A., Luo, H., Chen, Y.C., Carpenter, A.B., Dasgupta, P. Cancer Research. 2013.73, 4, 1329-1339. PMID: 23222296


Yanling
Yanling Yan, PhD
Assistant Professor

yan@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Involvement of Na/K-ATPase in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Activation of Src/ERK Pathway in LLC-PK1 CellsYu Wang, Qiqi Ye, Changxuan Liu, Jeffrey X Xie, Yanling Yan, Fangfang Lai, Qiming Duan, Xiaomei Li, Jiang Tian, and Zijian Xie.Free Radical Biology & Medicine. 2014, 71: 415-26. PMID:24703895

The involvement of reactive oxygen species in a feed-forward mechanism of Na/K-ATPase mediated signaling transduction.Yanling Yan, Anna P. Shapiro, Steven Haller, Vinai Katragadda, Lijun Liu, Jiang Tian, Venkatesha Basrur, Deepak Malhotra, Zi-jian Xie, Nader G. Abraham, Joseph I. Shapiro, and Jiang Liu. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2013, 288: 34249-34258. PMID: 24121502

Protein Carbonylation Regulates Renal Proximal Tubular Na/K-ATPase Signaling and Sodium Transport. Yanling Yan, Zi-jian Xie, Joseph I. Shapiro, and Jiang Liu. FASEB J. 2013, 27:231.7. PMID: 21555512


Serrat
Maria Serrat, PhD

Serrat@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Environmental temperature impact on bone and cartilage growth.
Serrat MA. Compr Physiol. 2014 Apr;4(2):621-55. doi: 10.1002/cphy.c130023.
PMID: 24715562 [PubMed - in process]

Hindlimb heating increases vascular access of large molecules to murine tibial growth plates measured by in vivo multiphoton imaging.
Serrat MA, Efaw ML, Williams RM. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2014 Feb 15;116(4):425-38. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.01212.2013. Epub 2013 Dec 26. PMID: 24371019 [PubMed - in process]

Allen’s rule revisited: temperature influences bone elongation during a critical period of postnatal development.
Serrat MA. Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;296(10):1534-45. doi: 10.1002/ar.22763. Epub 2013 Aug 19. PMID: 23956063 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Sodhi
Komal Sodhi, MD

sodhi@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Agonists of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids reduce infarct size and ameliorate cardiac dysfunction via activation of HO-1 and Wnt1 canonical pathway.Cao J, Tsenovoy PL, Thompson EA, Falck JR, Touchon R, Sodhi K , Rezzani R, Shapiro JI, Abraham NG.Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat. 2015 Jan-Mar;116-117:76-86. PMID:25677507

HO-1 Upregulation Attenuates Adipocyte Dysfunction, Obesity, and Isoprostane Levels in Mice Fed High Fructose Diets..Khitan Z, Harsh M, Sodhi K, Shapiro JI, Abraham NG.J Nutr Metab. 2014;2014:980547. PMID:25295182

CYP2J2 targeting to endothelial cells attenuates adiposity and vascular dysfunction in mice fed a high-fat diet by reprogramming adipocyte phenotype.Abraham NG, Sodhi K, Silvis AM, Vanella L, Favero G, Rezzani R, Lee C, Zeldin DC, Schwartzman ML.Hypertension. 2014 Dec;64(6):1352-61. PMID:25245389


Cecchetti
Alfred Cecchetti, PhD, MSc, MSc IS
Clinical Informatics Data Architect
ACTSI

Phone: (304) 691-1834
cecchetti@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Team building: electronic management-clinical translational research (eM-CTR) systems.Cecchetti AA, Parmanto B, Vecchio ML, Ahmad S, Buch S, Zgheib NK, Groark SJ Jr, Vemuganti A, Romkes M, Sciurba F, Donahoe MP, Branch RA.Clin Transl Sci. 2009 Dec;2(6):449-55. PMID:20443940

Family networks of obesity and type 2 diabetes in rural Appalachia.Pancoska P1, Buch S, Cecchetti A, Parmanto B, Vecchio M, Groark S, Paulsen S, Bardwell G, Morton C, Chester A, Branch R. Clin Transl Sci. 2009 Dec;2(6):413-21. PMID:20443933

Feasibility of adolescents to conduct community-based participatory research on obesity and diabetes in rural Appalachia.Bardwell G, Morton C, Chester A, Pancoska P, Buch S, Cecchetti A, Vecchio M, Paulsen S, Groark S, Branch RA. Clin Transl Sci. 2009 Oct;2(5):340-9. PMID:20443917


palianappan
Balasubramanian Palaniappan
PhD, Coordinator

palianappan@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Chronic and selective inhibition of basolateral membrane Na-K-ATPase uniquely regulates brush border membrane Na absorption in intestinal epithelial cellsManoharan, P., Gayam, S., Arthur, S., Palaniappan, B., Singh, S., Dick, G., & Sundaram, U.American Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology. 2015 00355. PMID:25652450

Antiviral activity of ancient system of ayurvedic medicinal plant Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae).Balasubramanian, P., Jayalakshmi, K., Vidhya, N., Prasad, R., Khaleefathullah Sheriff, A., Kathiravan, G., Rajagopal, K. and Sripathi M. Sureban. Journal of Basic and Clinical Pharmacy. 2010;1(1): 37-40.

Mast cell regulation of Na-glutamine co-transporters B0AT1 in villus and SN2 in crypt cells during chronic intestinal inflammation. Singh S, Arthur S, Talukder J, Balasubramanian, P., Coon S, et al. BMC gastroenterology. 2015; 15:47


Singh
Soudamani Singh
PhD
Coordinator

singhs@marshall.edu

For a full listing of publications, please access PubMed.

Chronic and selective inhibition of basolateral membrane Na-K-ATPase uniquely regulates brush border membrane Na absorption in intestinal epithelial cellsManoharan P, Gayam S, Arthur S, Palaniappan B, Singh S, Dick G, Sundaram U.American Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology. 2015 00355. PMID:25652450

Mast cell regulation of Na-glutamine co-transporters B0AT1 in villus and SN2 in crypt cells during chronic intestinal inflammationSingh S, Arthur S, Talukder J, Palaniappan B, Coon S, Sundaram UBMC Gastroenterol. 2015 Apr 15;15:47. doi: 10.1186/s12876-015-0275-5

Impact of experimental diabetes and insulin replacement on epididymal secretory products and sperm maturation in albino rats.Singh S, Malini T, Rengarajan S, Balasubramanian KJournal of cellular biochemistryl. 2009; 108(5):1094-101